LOVE BEARS ALL THINGS

Pope-Image

When a loving person can do good for others, or sees that others are happy, they themselves live happily and in this way give glory to God, for “God loves a cheerful giver” (2 Cor 9:7). Our Lord especially appreciates those who find joy in the happiness of others.

If we fail how to rejoice in the well-being of others, and focus primarily on our own needs, we condemn ourselves to a joyless existence, for, as Jesus said, “It is more blessed to give than to receive” (Acts 20:35).

The family must always be a place where, when something good happens to one of its members, they know that others will be there to celebrate it with them.

Excerpt from the book AMORIS LAETITIA (THE JOY OF LOVE) by Pope Francis

Advertisements

Saint of the Day: St. Peter Chanel

St Chanel

St. Peter Chanel was born in 1803 at Clet in the diocese of Belley, France. His intelligence and simple piety brought him to the attention of the local priest, Father Trompier, who saw to his elementary education. Entering the diocesan Seminary, Peter won the affection and the esteem of both students and professors.

After his ordination he found himself in a rundown country parish and completely revitalized it in the three year span that he remained there. However, his mind was set on missionary work; so, in 1831, he joined the newly formed Society of Mary (Marists) which concentrated on missionary work at home and abroad. To his dismay, he was appointed to teach at the seminary at Belley and remained there for the next five years, diligently performing his duties.

In 1836, the Society was given the New Hebrides in the Pacific as a field for evangelization, and the jubilant St. Peter was appointed Superior of a little band of missionaries sent to proclaim the Faith to its inhabitants. On reaching their destination after an arduous ten month journey, the band split up and St. Peter went to the Island of Futuna accompanied by a laybrother and an English layman, Thomas Boog. They were at first well received by the pagans and their king Niuliki who had only recently forbidden canabalism. However, the kings jealousy and fear were aroused when the missionaries learned the language and gained the people’s confidence; he realized the adoption of the Christian Faith would lead to the abolition of some of the prerogatives he enjoyed as both highpriest and sovereign.

Finally, when his own son expressed a desire to be baptized, the king’s hatred erupted and he dispatched a group of his warriors to set upon the saintly head of the missionaries. Thus, on April 28, 1841, three years after his arrival, St. Peter was seized and clubbed to death by those he had come to save. And his death brought his work to completion – within five months the entire island was converted to Christianity.
Source: Catholic.org

Saint of the Day: St. Zita ‪

Zita (2)

St. Zita was born into a poor but holy Christian family. Her older sister became a Cistercian nun and her uncle Graziano was a hermit whom the local people regarded as a saint. Zita herself always tried to do God’s will obediently whenever it was pointed out to her by her mother.

At the age of twelve Zita became a housekeeper in the house of a rich weaver in Lucca, Italy, eight miles from her home at Monte Sagrati. As things turned out, she stayed with that family for the last forty-eight years of her life. She found time every day to attend Mass and to recite many prayers, as well as to carry out her household duties so perfectly that the other servants were jealous of her. Indeed, her work was part of her religion!

She use to say: “a servant is not holy if she is not busy; lazy people of our position is fake holiness.” At first, her employers were upset by her generous gifts of food to the poor, but in time, they were completely won over by her patience and goodness and she became a very close friend.

St. Zita was given a free reign over her working schedule and busied herself with visits to the sick and those in prison. Word spread rapidly in Lucca of her good deeds and the heavenly visions that appeared to her.

She was sought out by the important people, and at her death in 1278 the people acclaimed her as a saint. She is the patroness of domestic workers. Her feast day is April 27.
Source:Catholic.org

Bible Quiz fir Children – Old Testament

Bible Quiz For Children

All children like to know the answers to their questions.

This book, dealing with Old Testament, provides the answers to a great many queries likely to be asked by children aged seven and upwards.

This superb compilation of questions and answers covers the whole Old Testament which will enthrall any child.

This can be a text book for children to learn the bible in a new and exciting way.

For More Information : http://bit.ly/1WlaCqN
‪#‎BookMarketing‬ ‪#‎Bible‬ ‪#‎OldTestament‬ ‪#‎Books‬ ‪#‎MustRead‬ ‪#‎Quiz‬

So You Want to Get Married

So you want to get married

The author knows his subject, he knows his readers and he knows how to communicate with them. When, further, he writes on an important and timely topic, the worth of the book is evident.

Fr Lesser is a dedicated missionary and pastor, preacher and writer. The present book is largely the fruit of his rich experience in guiding engaged and married couples. His thought is deeply inspired by the word of God. He is faithful to the teaching of the Church and at the same time his ideas are fresh and personal. Many times he seems to speak straight from the heart and invariably maintains the attention of the reader.

Today, more than ever, there is a need for an in-depth preparation for the sublime and difficult vocation of marriage. This book should be of great use in this matter. It should also be a guide to happy married life.

For Orders: http://bit.ly/1SpP9YM

Saint of the Day: St. George

It's not about how to achieve your dreams, it's about how to lead your life. If you lead your life the right way, the dreams will come to you.It is uncertain when Saint George was born and historians continue to debate to this day. However, his death date is estimated to be April 23 303 A.D.

The first piece of evidence of George’s existance appeared within the works of the Bollandists Daniel Papebroch, Jean Bolland, and Godfrey Henschen’s Bibliotheca Hagiographica Graeca. George was one of several names listed in the historical text, and Pope Gelasius claimed George was one of the saints “whose names are justly reverenced among men, but whose actions are known only to God.”

George was born to a Gerontios and Polychronia, a Roman officer and a Greek native of Lydda. Both were Christians from noble families of the Anici and George, Georgios in the original Greek, was raised to follow their faith.

When George was old enough, he was welcomed into Diocletian’s army. by his late 20’s, George became a Tribunus and served as an imperial guard for the Emperor at Nicomedia.

On February 24, 303 A.D., Diocletian, who hated Christians, announced that every Christian the army passed would be arrested and every other soldier should offer a sacrifice to the Roman gods.

George refused to abide by the order and told Diocletian, who was angry but greatly valued his friendship with George’s father.

When George announced his beliefs before his peers, Diocletian was unable to keep the news to himself.

In an effort to save George, Diocletian attempted to convert him to believe in the Roman gods, offered him land, money and slaves in exchange for offering a sacrifice to the Roman gods, and made several other offers that George refused.

Finally, after exhausting all other options, Diocletian ordered George’s execution. In preparation for his death, George gave his money to the poor and was sent for several torture sessions. He was lacerated on a wheel of swords and required resuscitation three times, but still George did not turn from God.

On April 23, 303 A.D., George was decapitated before Nicomedia’s outer wall. His body was sent to Lydda for burial, and other Christians went to honor George as a martyr.

Interesting Facts

Saint George stands out among other saints and legends because he is known and revered by both Muslims and Christians.

It is said Saint George killed the dragon near the sea in Beirut, thus Saint George bay was named in his honor.

Saint George is the patron saint of England and Catalonia and his cross can be found throughout England.

In older works, Saint George is depicted wearing armor and holding a lance or fighting a dragon, which represents Christ’s enemies.

Source: Catholic.org

The Importance of Bible Reflection

bible-thursday1

(Image Credits: Google)

Recent studies have found that however you learn, you will reap the most from careful reflection of your experiences. We all know that daily reflection on our activities and life can have a positive impact, however most often then not, we avoid doing this because either we are too busy or we don’t enjoy it .

Most people feel the same way about exercise too; we don’t necessarily enjoy doing it, but we know that if we keep sometime for regular exercise, the benefits from it far exceed that of any other health plan. It is the same with daily bible reflection. Just reading the bible and the scriptures is not enough. Keeping some time for reflecting on what the scriptures mean will vastly enhance our spiritual well being.

As Christopher J.H. Wright rightly said “God wants a whole society that will together reflect his character of generous justice.” Our priority should not only be carrying about our daily activities but also keeping some time to reflect on God’s words, because at the end of the day, that is what is most important, being close to God.

Now for the part where we don’t always enjoy it, there are many resources available that can guide us to make our reflections enjoyable. We can look at books, videos, audio files and much more. Thanks to the internet, information has become easily accessible, so why not use this to enhance our spiritual life as well. If you’re more comfortable reading books have a look at the book “A home full of mercyby Archbishop Vincenzo Paglia. In this book the entire Gospel of Luke is divided into 135 segments and offers a brief spiritual reflection on each segment.

Other than this, there are many other resources available, all we have to do is keep some time to make a conscious effort for reflection.

Saint of the Day: Saint Anslem

Saint of the Day

Saint Anselm of Canterbury (Latin: Anselmus Cantuariensis; c. 1033 – 21 April 1109), also called Anselm of Aosta (Italian: Anselmo d’Aosta) after his birthplace and Anselm of Bec (French: Anselme du Bec) after his monastery, was a Benedictine monk, abbot, philosopher and theologian of the Catholic Church, who held the office of archbishop of Canterbury from 1093 to 1109. After his death, he was canonized as a saint; his feast day is 21 April.

Beginning at Bec, Anselm composed dialogues and treatises with a rational and philosophical approach, sometimes causing him to be credited as the founder of Scholasticism. Despite his lack of recognition in this field in his own time, Anselm is now famed as the originator of the ontological argument for the existence of God and of the satisfaction theory of atonement. He was proclaimed a Doctor of the Church by a bull of Pope Clement XI in 1720.

As archbishop, he defended the church’s interests in England amid the Investiture Controversy. For his resistance to the English kings William II and Henry I, he was exiled twice: once from 1097 to 1100 and then from 1105 to 1107. While in exile, he helped guide the Greek bishops of southern Italy to adopt Roman rites at the Council of Bari. He worked for the primacy of Canterbury over the bishops of York and Wales but, though at his death he appeared to have been successful, Pope Paschal II later reversed himself and restored York’s independence.
Source: Wikipedia

Amoris Laetitia, the New Apostolic Exhortation of Pope Francis.

Amoris-Laetitia

Much of the “Amoris Laetitia” consists on the reflections of the Gospels and church teaching on love, the family and children.

It begins with an opening chapter inspired by the Scriptures, to set a proper tone. Thereafter, the Holy Father examines the actual situation of families, and recalls some essential aspects of the Church’s teaching on marriage and the family, thus paving the way for two central chapters dedicated to love.

Further on the Pope highlights some pastoral approaches that can guide us in building sound and fruitful homes in accordance with God’s plan, with a full chapter dedicated to raising of children.

Finally, he offers an invitation to mercy and pastoral discernment of those situations that fall short of what the Lord demands of us, and conclude with a brief discussion of family spirituality.

The copy of this book will be available 15th April. Send your orders to st.paulsmarketing@gmail.com or bybbangalore@gmail.com